The rosters for the Davis Cup Finals have been announced, the field solidly stacked. (Getty)

If the field of players is any indication, the inaugural Davis Cup Finals, coming to Madrid Nov. 18–24, has the potential to be a great event.

This year, in lieu of the classic format, the top 18 nations are contesting a World Cup–style tournament over the span a week. As a result, Rafael Nadal, Novak Djokovic and Andy Murray are all scheduled to compete. Of course, the main name missing is Roger Federer; he's ineligible because Switzerland lost its qualifying match to Russia, in February. 

The United States team—looking to take home its first Davis Cup since 2007—will be led by new faces in the absence of John Isner, who's expecting his second baby. Instead, the top players will be 21-year-old Taylor Fritz and 22-year-old Reilly Opelka. They'll be joined by Frances Tiafoe, also 21, Sam Querrey and doubles standout Jack Sock. 

This will also be the team's first Davis Cup under new captain Mardy Fish. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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The Americans have been drawn into Group F, which also features Italy, with its dual threat of Matteo Berrettini and Fabio Fognini ... 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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And Canada, which boasts Felix Auger-Aliassime and Denis Shapovalov, two of the top three players in the Next Gen standings. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Group A is led by No. 1 seeds France, who were champions in 2017 and finalists in 2018.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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They've been given the difficult draw of Djokovic's Serbia ... 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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And Japan, which will be missing Kei Nishikori, out with a right-elbow injury

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Group B has defending champions Croatia, with Marin Cilic and Borna Coric ...

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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As well as both US Open finalists, with Nadal's Spain, playing at home ... 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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And Daniil Medvedev's Russia, which also features other rising stars Karen Khachanov and Andrey Rublev. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Group C, meanwhile, has 2016 Davis Cup champions Argentina ... 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Chile, with two-time 2019-title winner Cristian Garin ... 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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And Germany, which will be missing Alexander Zverev, who's instead playing an exhibition with Federer in Mexico City. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Australia, in Group D, has won more Davis Cup titles than any nation except the U.S. And its top four are all expected in Madrid, including Alex de Minaur and Nick Kyrgios. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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The group also has David Goffin's Belgium ... 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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And Colombia, with doubles No. 1s and Wimbledon and US Open champions Juan Sebastian Cabal and Robert Farah. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Finally, Group E features 2015 champions Great Britain, starring the resurgent Andy Murray ... 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Alexander Bublik's Kazakhstan ...

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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And Robin Haase's Netherlands. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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There will be an awful lot at stake this November for how the viewing public receives the changes to the tournament. At the very least, the caliber of players scheduled seems to be a solid start.