The Scot says there's less than 50 percent chance he'll play singles at Wimbledon. (AP)

Judy Murray, mother and former coach of Andy Murray, has shared that her son's future prospects in the sport are good. This news arrived despite the 31-year-old Murray's move to undergo a hip operation after his first-round ouster in January's Australian Open.

As reported by the Independent and other British and global media sources, Judy Murray said, "But I tell you, if anybody can do it, he can, because he will put his heart and soul into it like he does with everything. So fingers crossed." 

Andy's mum also shared that "he is in a good place mentally" and that the procedure he underwent will certainly improve his long-term "quality of life." 

Murray made headlines early this year after a lachrymose press conference in Melbourne, in which he stated that he hoped to recover fully, or enough to compete, at Wimbledon before retiring from his professional playing career. His admission then was met with much fanfare in the media and heartfelt reactions from his peers on the ATP and WTA tours.

Andy Murray just spoke to the BBC, saying he's "pain-free." 

"The operation went well," he said. "I'm feeling good and walking around pain free–which hasn't been the case for pretty much 18 months, two years."

The Scot isn't allowed to do any high-impact movement for four months. 

"I don't feel any pressure to come back and play," the three-time Grand Slam champion said. "I just want the hip to be as good as it can be and if it allows me to play, that's brilliant. If not, I'm not in pain anymore and I'm happy with that."

Murray presently appears at No. 213 in the rankings. In January, he hinted at playing Wimbledon, but it may not happen. 

"To play singles at Wimbledon I'd say it would be less than 50 percent chance, doubles maybe possibly," Murray said. 

A full return isn't guaranteed, but Murray seems confident he will try to return. 

Follow Jon on Twitter: @jonscott9.